Pregnancy

One of my favorite people just had a baby and she was telling me about some back pain that she had when she was pregnant, and continues to have. Let me tell you a little bit about the anatomy of the spine. The spine is curvy. That curve that goes in a little bit at your low back, that’s called lordosis. Move up the spine to the upper back, that curve is the opposite. This curve, the one that curves out a little bit, is called kyphosis.

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Then at your neck the spine curves in a little bit again and you have some more lordosis. When all is said and done(I guess that saying doesn’t really apply here but whatever) the spine when looked at from the side should look like a backwards ‘S.’ The main thing you want to do when trying to have super duper good posture is maintain these curves.
Pregnancy causes one to have a rather large belly. When looking at a pregnant woman from the side, it appears that she has increased lordosis in her lumbar spine(increased inward curvature of the low back). However, this is an optical illusion and is not the case. Actually, in most cases pregnancy will cause the lumbar spine to be kyphotic(increased outward curvature) because the fetus is actually pushing out on the lumbar spine so instead of creating more lordosis(inward curve), kyphosis(outward curve) is created despite looking very much like the low back is much more lordotic. For each condition, increased kyphosis or increased lordosis, there are certain things that you can do to help the back pain but the first step is figuring out why you are having pain and what your spine is doing which you cannot do by just looking at the spine or saying “well you’re pregnant, this is why you have pain…”
Does that make sense? Most PTs and doctors would not say this to you. That pregnancy causes your spine to do this but I’m very much used to saying things that people disagree with so believe what you will.

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Categories: Health, Rehab

Tags: , , , ,

28 replies

  1. Scared me with the title. I thought you were pregnant.

  2. Amy, you have plenty to say that is helpful, worthwhile (technically and otherwise), and usually intriguing, yet you all-too-often add a contentious punchline such as “I’m very much used to saying things that people disagree with so believe what you will.” That line lands on this reader as looking for a fight with someone.

    Please know that I am not taking that personally. Neither am I mad at you or disappointed. Indeed, any person who clearly speaks his or her mind will encounter disagreement! Yet any person who authentically speaks his or her mind has a real opportunity to enrich a discussion, yes?

    Namaste.

    • You cannot even begin to comprehend how this has affected me happening at my age. So if I seem argumentative it’s because I am. As I’ve said before, if you don’t like the way I write or you think my blog has too much negativity then don’t read it.

      • Amy, I do not pretend to know how “this” has affected you at your age. I do know that any person is in trouble if he or she is afflicted with the disease of terminal uniqueness. Read what I actually wrote (especially my second paragraph).

        FYI, At age nineteen I suffered a TBI in combat, temporarily paralyzed from the neck down. I had a striking recovery helped by studying martial arts since age five (judo, aikido, tang soo do, and hand-to-hand combat instruction and teaching in the military) and years of studying and using physiology and kinesthesiology. (I am aware of what you have let us know of you considerable training.)

        Years later (September 6, 2008) I had a massive hemorrhage (SAH) stroke as a long-delayed secondary effect from the TBI. The stroke left me immediately completely paralyzed on my entire right side, unable to speak, and wrestling with different types of aphasia.

        I ask you again: “Please know that I am not taking that personally. Neither am I mad at you or disappointed. Indeed, any person who clearly speaks his or her mind will encounter disagreement! Yet any person who authentically speaks his or her mind has a real opportunity to enrich a discussion, yes?”

        • Billy: I don’t care if you’re mad at me or disappointed and it’s quite narcissistic of you to think that I might care.

        • Bottom line, this is MY blog and through it I’ve helped hundreds of people. Don’t come on MY blog and tell me I should be doing something differently.

        • billye22 – What does this mean: “I do know that any person is in trouble if he or she is afflicted with the disease of terminal uniqueness.” You don’t sound mad but you do sound annoyed. Finally, we have all had “massive” hemorrhages and “massive” strokes. Yet the members of our tribe have learned to support one another, not to compete in that juvenile “mine is bigger than yours” sort of way.

        • Also Billy this line of yours “(I am aware of what you have let us know of you considerable training.)”

          Again, MY blog. So sorry (not really) if you don’t like that I’ve talked about my training on MY blog. You want to make people aware of your knowledge and training, start your OWN blog. Don’t come back to mine please.

  3. Ah Amy, I love your willingness to speak as it really is. Sometimes you even convince me.

  4. Amy, your comment box says “I love comments!” Is that accurate? I encourage you to DISPASSIONATELY, ACTUALLY READ what I wrote you. Your response gives little evidence of that. And I am not mad at all. No doubt you have helped, and will help, MANY people. May you too heal. Peace.

  5. I find almost incomprehensible that a fellow stroke survivor has said something like this to me, stressed me out like this and put me in this mood. That’s absolutely absurd. And it’s not the first time this has happened. No one else do that please. I’ll be changing my comment box to say “comment at your own risk.”

  6. Amy, I never have thought of conversation with a fellow stroke survivor in those terms, and until today I have never engaged a fellow stroke survivor in an argument. I have had many, many discussions with other stroke survivors. I have spent countless hours online, on the telephone and in person doing the best I could to help those with which I communicated. For several years I had a very active blog. Yet I certainly have never looked at any discussion with fellow stroke survivor as competitive, as contentious, as man vs. woman, as young vs. old, etc. None of any of this, or anything I have commented on today, has been intended to do anything but help. Annoyed? Rather, more puzzled or at a loss as to how to authentically write to you. Certainly no person can judge another’s pain or his or her seemingly inextricable sorrow. I wish you all the best…

  7. I still have to remind myself that the title is not about you. Just like when you had Rubber Ducky and it was not about your tub playtoys as rehab. I really do try not to be bad 🙂

  8. during my first pregnancy, I didn’t have any pain. Actually, the whole first one was different. I’m not sure if the second time was so different because I am now a stroke survivor, or almost 5years older, or just because….but it was very different this last time. My back started hurting about midway through. I strengthened my abdomen/core and the pain went away. Even though I am very well recovered, my left side is still not as strong as the right. I think that has something to do with the pains that arise from time to time.

  9. I need another hit of Amy blogging – Please – I’m addicted and I refuse to go thru withdrawal. Its nasty.

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