Lateral Shift

A search term on my blog today was “soap note for hip lateral shift mckenzie.”  That was written by a physical therapist.  That is really specific and it uses therapist speak.  I didn’t realize how much I loved and missed this stuff until recently when I started being immersed in it again because of my chart review job and realizing that I will most likely never do it again.  A lateral shift means your low back hurts.  Or maybe your hip hurts.  When a lateral shift is present, your upper body is shifted to either the right or left because (probably because) an intervertebral disc in your low back is displaced (bulging) out to the side preventing your spine from being straight up and down like a good spine should.  Your upper body is “leaning away from the pain.”  It looks like this……

lateral shift left

(Pic from here, they have British accents and say physiotherapist, I love it!)  That picture is a bit exaggerated.  The shift is always named by the superior segment so in the picture that would be called a left lateral shift.  So how do you fix it?  Well…….if your shoulders are shifted to the left and you have low back pain, I’ll bet you a million dollars that your pain is on the right side of your low back.  Or in your right hip.  Or you have pain going down your right leg.  To eliminate the pain, first you want to see that pain ‘centralize’ meaning moving the pain to the middle of your low back and not just to one side.  So first you have to address the shift.  There are ways to try this yourself but you might need a PT’s help the first few times.  Here’s the exercise to try on your own.  This is for a left lateral shift which means your shoulders are shifted to the left relative to your hips and your low back pain is on the right.  If the exercises don’t work, here is what a therapist would do.  Then this kind of thing would typically be followed by some by some extension exercises.  These extension exercises would be progressed as much as need be and you would be lectured to about having good posture and then you would be tested bending forward to make sure that doesn’t bring the pain back and if it doesn’t you would be discharged never to be seen in PT again unless you have a stroke.

 

DISCLAIMER:  I had a stroke, so don’t you dare listen to my advice.

Advertisements


Categories: Health, Rehab

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

6 replies

  1. I’m no physiotherapist, and Im fortunate to have avoided back pain until this point in life so far, but it’s great advice and will help when my wife has back problems. I love your stroke disclaimer 🙂 I want one of my own.

    • My friends said they’re gonna make me a card that just stays ‘STROKE’ so I can carry it around and whip it out whenever because whenever I’m acting shitty or inappropriate I “play the stroke card.” Playing the stroke card is a great excuse for a lot of things HAHA!

  2. But then again, my hip was in excruciating pain and it turned out to be my degenerative arthritis of the spine from my accident.

  3. I’m going to have to try this, not sure if this is my problem but I do get low back pain when walking and stopping a lot.
    I’m also trying to correct left shoulder slumping. I’m sure its because my left arm has gained weight. Spasticity must weigh a lot.

Say things.................

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: