Meditation: proven science – very, very, very proven

Meditation: still considered an “alternative” and “complementary” treatment

Meditation: not at all a part of mainstream Western Medicine, only Eastern Medicine

Meditation: thousands upon thousands of research articles proving how it positively affects and changes the brain

Meditation: might just be the absolute best, scientifically proven intervention for healing the brain that was never recommended to you by your doctor.  Certainly wasn’t recommended to me and every single other stroke survivor that I have ever met.

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Original post from Dean’s blog……

Harvard neuroscientist: Meditation not only reduces stress, here’s how it changes your brain

But I bet your doctor doesn’t have this as a stroke protocol.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/inspired-life/wp/2015/05/26/harvard-neuroscientist-meditation-not-only-reduces-stress-it-literally-changes-your-brain/?
A couple of lines from there. Why the hell doesn’t your doctor know about this? And prescribe this? Are they that clueless?We found long-term meditators have an increased amount of gray matter in the insula and sensory regions, the auditory and sensory cortex.

We also found they had more gray matter in the frontal cortex, which is associated with working memory and executive decision making.

Q: So how long does someone have to meditate before they begin to see changes in their brain?
Lazar: Our data shows changes in the brain after just eight weeks.



Categories: Brain stuff, Health, Recovery, Rehab, Stroke stuff

Tags: , , , , , , ,

19 replies

  1. Ah yes Amy, I’m going to be considered the worst bastard there is out there in stroke. And I will prove every single one of them wrong. No arrogance in me, none whatsover.

  2. Sorry Amy, I’m getting really pissy in my blog. I really hate interacting with stupid people.

  3. I can’t stand up when I’m on the floor. Do you have suggestions for any other forms of meditation?

    • So I uhh accidentally published my reply to your comment as an entire blog post so my reply should be in your email right now. LOL oops!!!!!!!!!!! No more replying to comments on my phone.

      You don’t have to sit on the floor to meditate. You can sit in a chair or anywhere else that’s comfortable.

      • I wondered why I got that email! Meditation can be done anywhere on a chair on the floor. If you look it up you have to practice at it, trying to clear your mind. We had an instructor come into work that showed us some simple stuff that I am experimenting with. It’s doing it every day and finding your center. The brain I believe can be reprogramed..

        • I most definitely have PTSD now, without question. Sometimes I feel as if I have absolutely no control over my emotions. Meditation is the only thing that helps.

          • I find talking helps but I need to feel I have control not it. Why did it happen, why did I loose control? I really hope I can find a way to control it because I’ll be fine for months then boom it slowly comes back, a bit at a time then hits me.

  4. Meditation is something I am very much interested in. We had a gentleman come into the office to show us some. I believe I am suffering from PTSD now and just have really off days. I am hoping this will help as I know it’s all in my head, it’s my mind playing tricks on me. I really hope it helps

    • I had PTSD afterwards too. I saw a psychologist for awhile and I meditate…. I’m not sure which helped the most. Also about on the floor. I lay in my bed. I find it most comfortable there, and it works for me.

      • do you still have it but you manage it now or did you find it is gone now? I have been up all night anxious and I have no idea why. It’s such a scary feeling. I have no idea how to deal with this crap any more.

        • Mine is gone now. I did a ton of “therapies”….just about everything you could think of. The PTSD mostly went away with the psychologist….I think. She had me go back over the whole ordeal and cope with all the emotions I had stuffed down/ignored because it was all too much at the time. Once I dealt with it all, it went away. Bt i started meditating about the same time, so its hard to know which fixed it. Some meds can cause anxiety too, so talk to ur doctors….maybe you need to change some stuff. One med I took for fatigue had me climbing out of my skin. As soon as I stopped taking it, it was gone.

          • Mine never completely goes away. I think it’s gone then it’ll come back with a vengeance for a few days. Because of this I’ve cut some people/things out of my life, primarily family members, that don’t at all try to understand what I’m going through and don’t try to help me emotionally whatsoever. They just keep causing it or add onto all the shit that I’m already dealing with. Until recently, not one person except for one friend of mine helped me emotionally through this. I was alone. I was supported financially, but I was alone.

          • I had to cave in, when to the hospital and got some clonazepam to take the edge off, it was really bad last night. I have no idea what triggered it but it got bad. Have to tie me over till I get some more therapy to help it’s not cheap in Canada almost 100 an hour. It did help take off the edge

  5. I wish in Canada some of these things would be covered by OHIP as mental illness is an illness that need to be treated. I want to try meditation, I want to try anything to squash these bad days that I have, depression and anxiety. It stops my life in its tracks when it happens.

  6. Spread the word – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/sandra-bond-chapman/changing-a-common-belief-_b_7588400.html

    No longer can we falsely assume that brain injury survivors can recover only for a certain period or that they are destined to regain only a limited number of skills. The potential for improvement is far greater than previously believed possible. With the right interventions, BI survivors can continue to make progress repairing their brain’s health and their lives for many years. That knowledge should significantly change the way we think about–and address–this enormous public health challenge

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